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    Help the USDA Forest Service

    Researchers at the Northern Research Station, NRS-04, Delaware, Ohio would like to expand current efforts to screen ash trees that may be tolerant or resistant to emerald ash borer (EAB).

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    Prevent feral swine overpopulation in Michigan

    Hunting season is in full swing and wildlife officials are encouraging the shooting of the destructive and disease-carrying feral swine. The USDA is working with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Michigan Wildlife Conservancy, the Michigan Pork Producers Association and other private groups to stop the spread of wild boars in the state by killing the nuisance animals.

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    Eyes on the Forest

    The Eyes on the Forest project allows users to identify “sentinel” trees which they agree to inspect annually for certain signs of deterioration or infestation.

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    Beware: Japanese knotweed!

    If you see a bamboo-like shrub with reddish stems at the edge of your yard, take note and do not cut, dig or mow it. It might be Japanese Knotweed, a plant that is invading areas of Michigan and poses threats to natural areas and developed property. The plant spreads rapidly when it is mowed or pulled. If it gets close to a home or road it can sprout through foundations, roads, sidewalks and even damage sewers.

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    Boaters and anglers can help

    Nearly everyone who spends time on Michigan’s lakes and streams has experienced some of the impacts invasive species have had on our aquatic habitats. Zebra mussels cover the bottom of many shallow, rocky lakes and streams. Their filter feeding clears the water, leading to nuisance algae blooms and excess growth of aquatic plants. The invasive Eurasian watermilfoil is one such plant. It grows to the surface and forms dense mats that make power boating difficult and crowds out native plants. In addition to these well-known pests, hosts of other invaders are spreading through Michigan waters.

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    Aquatic invasive species in Michigan

    A recent invader is the crustacean known as bloody red shrimp (Hemimysis anomala), first found in late 2006 in the channel between Lake Michigan and Muskegon Lake. The presence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), a fish disease, has already caused several large-scale fish kills in the Great Lakes.2 Still other species, such as Asian carp, would potentially have a devastating impact on Michigan’s sport fishery if they make their way into the Great Lakes.

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Get Involved / Explore

Begin by exploring what coalition partners have to offer in your region. Use the map to select an area and find partners active in your region.

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Alerts / Emerging Issues

Asian Long-Horned Beetle


Asian long-horned beetles feed on several species of hardwood trees. It’s favorite host is maple. Additional preferred hosts include elm, willow, buckeye, horse chestnut and birch. Suspect beetle can be killed and preserved in regular rubbing alcohol in a liquid-proof container, or even in a container placed in a freezer. If you collect a specimen contact the Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development.

Tools

MISIN Smartphone App


The MISIN smartphone app is available for both iPhone and Android devices. It provides a mobile solution for the capture of invasive species field observation data. You can play an important role in the early detection and rapid response to new invasive threats in your area by contributing invasive species observations to the MISIN database.
Demo
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